About your Search

20121210
20121210
STATION
CNBC 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
CSPAN2 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
other. they discovered they were twin sisters separated from birth in china it is against the one of the girls was given up for adoption. they share mannerisms and they were married in the same year. the husband has the same first name. >> steve: and they dress alike. >> gretchen: what a fantastic story. the rest of the headlines ttook over 50 years for the murderer of a 7 year old to b brought to justice. jack mccullah will be sentenced for the murder. it is one of the oldest unsolved crimes. he was dismissed as a suspect but arrested last year after the investigation reopened. >> steve: meanwhile a 22 year old woman in oregon jumped in her car and drove off after two kids tried to rob her at gun point. the boys later to be found 7 and 11 years old. demanded money and her phone. >> i was afraid he would shoot my tires or window. i didn't think i was safe. >> brian: the boys were caught and turns out the gun was not loaded it is not known how they got the gun. they were turned over to their familis and the case is expected to go to jv court. >> brian: two students are accused of b
for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been m
your report opens up. a tragic tale of a legal immigrant to this country from china, she was brutally attacked by an illegal immigrant from china, and after chen served his prison term, china refused to take him back. what happened? >> immigration officials in texas let him out more than once, and no point did they ever warn ms. wu this is a wider issue in the immigrant question. that's secrecy. they don't tell the public very much unlike the criminal system who they arrest, who they detain, and what happens to them in the case of ms. wu, she thought the man who brutally attacked her was in china and one day, three years later, he walks through her door and shortly after that kills her. >> why is this happening? why do we have no dodknowledge it? >> the immigration system says they are a civil immigration agency, they detain people they treat like criminals whether they have a record or not and they said that they believe that this is a private matter, that they need to protect the immigrants's privacy. so when we request the name of criminals, they said that the public interest in th
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
are general electric, which has been a major outsourcer of jobs to china and other countries, do you think you're going to be talking about trade policy in the united states of america or maybe nuclear power in the united states of america? >> but this puzzles me. the fcc tried to do essentially the same thing four years ago, as you know, in the last year of the bush administration. and the senate went on record against it. you passed a strong resolution to say, "this far and no further." why would president obama's fcc chairman, try to do now what the republicans couldn't do then? >> that is a very good question, bill. and i don't have the answer. and it's not only that the senate passed a strong resolution. there were public hearings. and there was the opportunity for the public to give input into this decision making process. and huge numbers of people said, "wait a second, we do not need more media consolidation in america." senate came on record. so why the obama administration is doing something that the bush administration failed to do is beyond my understanding. and we're going to do e
, rare collectors items, and pets. how big a business is the turtle-tortoise trade? >> goode: china alone is probably in the hundreds of millions of dollars. this trade flourishes because the payoff is huge and the chance of getting prosecuted and incarcerated are very low. >> stahl: if you're going to be in something illicit, this is the safest or one of the safest. >> goode: and that's a tragedy. >> stahl: eric goode is spending a million dollars a year of his own money to fight the trade in places like madagascar, an island off the coast of africa, that's vastly undeveloped. >> goode: people are so poor, some of these villages make less than a dollar a day, or it's basically subsistence living. and there just simply isn't the political will of the country to really enforce, you know, what's going on with their natural heritage, whether it's tortoises or other wildlife. >> stahl: fly over madagascar and you can see why conservationists say it's bleeding to death-- rivers run red with soil erosion from logging and slash-and-burn agriculture that have wiped out animal habitats and 90% of
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)